New Year's Adventures To Start Your Year Right

By the Wild Women On Top Team

New Year’s Eve is often a night to remember, for all the wrong reasons. The swarms of people packed in like locusts on the lawns of the harbour, waiting for a firework display that often lets you down. The inability to find a taxi, the crowded public transport services. Tired children, and even tireder parents. The hangover.

But what if it didn’t need to be that way? What if you could see the new year in somewhere magical, somewhere tranquil, accompanied by just your loved ones and mother nature. What if you could wake up for the sunrise and greet the day with wonder, joy and a pain-free head?

Well, you can. Here are our top 5 picks for an adventurous New Year.

1. Sleep out in Sydney Harbour National Park

Hike down to Washaway Beach in Sydney Harbour National Park at sunset on New Year’s Eve with your bottle of bubbles, prawns and sleeping mat. Head left on the cliff line for about 100 meters then scramble down to the right to the overhanging ledge which looks directly out to the Sydney Heads. Go wild till dark, sleep under the stars then let the twilight release you from your slumber as the sun rises over the Sydney Harbour Heads for the New Year. Magic. - By Di Westaway, CEO of Wild Women On Top

2. Sundowners at Stockton Dunes, Port Stephens  

Get lost in the mesmerising, endless sand of Stockton dunes. Go quad biking or simply wander, followed by sundowners and a picnic on top of a sand dune looking over the endless beach. - By Tania Taylor, General Manager of Wild Women On Top

3. Star gaze in Kanangra-Boyd National Park

Camp under the stars in the great wildness of Kanangra Walls. Take friends and family, bikes, packs and swimmers and explore away from the crowds under nature’s fireworks.  - By Kate Clissold, Coastrek Ambassador

4. Camp in Wineglass Bay, Tasmania

On New Year’s Eve, hike 2-3 hours from the Wineglass Bay carpark, past the tourist lookout and along the bay itself, before you reach the secluded campsite for sunset drinks and supper. Unzip your tent on New Year’s Day to the majestic Wineglass Bay, then take a dip in the turquoise waters and explore the peaks of the surrounding mountains for a January 1 well spent. – By Bella Westaway, Content and Engagement Editor at Wild Women On Top

5. Watch the sun rise from Cape Byron

It’s common to catch the first rays on light from the summit of Mt Warning on New Year’s Day, but with ‘common’ comes crowded trails and a not-so-peaceful experience. Instead, enjoy the sunrise from Cape Byron before strolling down the usually-crowded beach and watching the surfers catch the first waves of the year. By Ralf Buckley

2018 is not far away, so now is the time to commit to a Happy New You. To embrace adventures in nature, time with friends, giving back and smashing new goals. Join us in Sydney, Melbourne or Sunshine Coast for a magical 30km or 60km Team Trekking Challenge. Start your journey. 

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