Gourmet Veggie Cous Cous For The Trail

Recipe developed by Di Westaway and Wild Women On Top

This recipe is so good you'll want to make it at home, but we promise it tastes better on day three of a hike... 

With planning, a few key ingredients such as garlic and ginger, plus tips such as carrying fresh herbs in kitchen paper towel, you can carry and create delicious, nutritious meals for up to six nights hiking. All quantities here are for light-weight, low-fuel bush cooking, using dehydrated individual components. For extra yum, substitute dry ingredients with fresh ones for shorter adventures. Leaders should practice at home first. Ensure you have enough pots/bowls and a mini chopping board or plastic plate to chop on. Don’t carry extra – use what the team have carried but plan ahead.

Wild Women On Top connect through community cooking, and we love to cook together. Make sure everyone chips in with chopping, cooking, washing up and planning. You can get/prepare some of the ingredients before you leave home and the rest immediately prior to trekking. 

Note: if you’re not an experienced cook, practice the recipes at home first and throw a copy of the recipes into your pack.

 Ingredients:

  • 5 cups cous cous (allow 75gm per person)
  • fresh herbs such as coriander, mint, dill, chives*
  • 5tsp veg stock
  • 1 fresh lime
  • Packet of Moroccan spice mix
  • 200g dried mushrooms
  • 150g butter
  • 3 small finger eggplants
  • 1 thumb each of ginger and garlic
  • 100g sun dried tomatoes (dry, not in oil)
  • 100g pine nuts
  • 2 small sultana packets

*carry fresh herbs whole and wrapped in kitchen paper in plastic bag to last for up to 4 days

Method:

In the morning, add mushrooms and tomatoes to a nalgene bottle full of water and soak in your pack all day.  When you get to camp, boil veg stock and 10 cups water, add cous cous and let sit for 5 mins. Chop herbs finely and set aside. Finely chop or grate garlic and ginger and add to a pan with butter, chopped eggplant, chopped sun dried tomatoes & mushrooms. Toast pine nuts in dry pan. Combine all ingredients and mix in pan. To serve, add fresh herbs, lime and sprinkle with pine nuts.

 

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